Numerous Severe Thunderstorms Ending This Weekend

May 20, 2012; 9:35 PM
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Strong storms over the Chicago Skyline. Photo courtesy of Photos.com

The weekend is ending with severe thunderstorms rumbling from the western Great Lakes to the Texas Panhandle and the Tennessee Valley.

Violent thunderstorms have and will remain most numerous across the western Great Lakes.

The weekend started off with a bang as damaging wind and hail-producing thunderstorms pounded the central High Plains. Even a couple of storms in southern Kansas and Nebraska spawned tornadoes late Saturday.

Similar powerful thunderstorms slammed northern Wisconsin and neighboring upper Michigan earlier this afternoon. Strong winds from one thunderstorm ripped the roof off an older building east of Stetsonville, Wis.

Additional severe thunderstorms will erupt into this evening not only across the western Great Lakes, but also southward to the Tennessee Valley and back to the Texas Panhandle.

Cities within this corridor include Green Bay, Wis., Chicago, Ill., St. Louis, Mo., Nashville, Tenn., and Lubbock, Texas.

The primary threats with the storms will continue to be damaging winds, hail and downpours. As is the case with all thunderstorms, frequent lightning is also expected.

It is not out of the question that a tornado touches down, especially across the western Great Lakes.

The thunderstorms will also bring disappointment for those hoping to catch a glimpse of today's solar eclipse.

The strongest thunderstorms are expected to weaken in intensity overnight.

On Monday, the cold front will track eastward, shifting the core of showers and thunderstorms into the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley down into the Deep South and southern Plains.

AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski contributed to the content of this story.

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