Flash Flooding Concerns Sunday Night: Dallas, Abilene

By , Senior Meteorologist
July 14, 2013; 8:58 PM ET
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Play video Breaking weather is detailed in the above AccuWeather.com video.

Despite being needed, rain threatens to show its ugly face across the corridor from Dallas to Abilene Sunday night.

There is growing concern that the band of rain dropping southward from Oklahoma will take up residence across the corridor from Dallas to Abilene, Texas, Sunday night.

The band will then be slow to shift westward out of the region Monday and Monday night, leading to many places picking up a total of 1 to 3 inches of rain.

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While AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Joseph McCormick states that the rain is needed to ease the ongoing drought and recent heat wave, that amount of rain threatens to flood low-lying and poor drainage areas and push streams out of their banks.

Such flooding is sure to result where the rain lingers the longest and drops localized totals of 4 to 6 inches.

The fact that the recent heat has dried out and hardened the ground, making it more difficult initially for the ground to absorb downpours, has made north-central Texas more susceptible to flash flooding.

The rain spreading into Dallas is the city's first measurable rain event in nearly a month, and has ended the city's stretch of triple-digit-heat from last Tuesday to Saturday.

Even if flooding fails to develop, motorists should use caution Sunday night through Monday.

Downpours will dramatically reduce visibility and vehicles traveling at highway speeds may hydroplane as water ponds on roadways. Motorists planning to travel on I-20 are at risk for these dangers.

Airline passengers should also prepare for possible flight delays.

Dallas Local Radar:

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