Drenching Rain to Soak Philadelphia Through Midweek

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
April 30, 2014; 1:01 PM
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Play video AccuWeather Chief Meteorologist Elliot Abrams discusses the weather in detail in this video.

While the week started on a dry note, a slow-moving storm has the potential to unload several inches of rain on the Philadelphia area through midweek.

The same storm responsible for severe weather and tornadoes over the Central and Southern states will send periods of rain through the mid-Atlantic and into the Northeast.

While the rain will alleviate brushfire conditions, it can bring problems on the other end of the spectrum, such as travel delays from flash and urban flooding, as well as poor visibility.

The rain postponed Phillies/Mets baseball at Citizen's Bank Park Wednesday evening.

RELATED:
Detailed Philadelphia Forecast
Philadelphia Interactive Weather Radar
Forecast Temperature Maps

During Thursday, the flow will become more west to southwesterly. From this direction, the chilly flow from the Atlantic Ocean will be turned off. However, eventually cooler air from the Midwest will filter east of the Appalachians this weekend.

The reversal of the winds will not end the chance of rain. The pattern could allow spotty heavy, gusty thunderstorms to come calling on Thursday.

Spotty showers from the ancient storm over the Midwest will settle over the region this weekend.

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