Denver's Roller-Coaster Weather, Late-Week Snow Potential

By , Meteorologist
October 22, 2012; 5:23 AM
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Following above-normal warmth to start the week, snow and freezing temperatures will return for Denver by late in the week.

Highs will climb into the 70s in Denver on Monday and Tuesday, rising about 10-15 degrees above normal. An area of high pressure will dominate, promoting the dry weather with partial sunshine and unusual warmth.

RELATED: Rain, Mountain Snow Pound Northern California, Northwest

On Wednesday, the high will top out closer to normal in the lower 60s before drastic changes occur overnight. A powerful cold front will plow through the area, bringing rain followed by snow as the low plummets below freezing.

"Denver's first snow! #snow #1stsnow #notreadyforsnow #sopretty #nofilter #bestoftheday #picoftheday," said Instagram user melauder on Oct. 7, 2012.

Colder air will linger through the rest of the week with highs reaching only near freezing on Friday. The best chance of accumulating snow will occur during the day Friday.

Keep checking back with AccuWeather.com for the latest on this week's wild weather.

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