Deadly Quake Rocks China

By Evan Duffey, Meteorologist
April 21, 2013; 2:55 PM
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An earthquake struck southwestern China early on Saturday, killing over a hundred and injuring thousands.

The quake, which measured 6.6 on the Richter scale, brought devastation to the Sichuan province, the same region that had an earthquake in 2008 kill almost 70,000 people and injured over a quarter million. That earthquake however was much stronger, a 7.9.

Damage to the regions infrastructure is widespread, with thousands of damaged buildings, power outages and blocked roadways. Mountain roads in the region were especially impacted, with dislodged boulders blocking roadways there.

According to the China Daily, the Chengdu Airport was briefly closed and train traffic in the area was also briefly suspended.

The weather across the region will not be optimal, but should also not threaten recovery efforts. The next few days will be cloudy, with a couple of showers possible each day.

Caption for the thumbnail: A man sits in front of the houses destroyed by an earthquake which hit Lushan county in Ya'an in southwest China's Sichuan province on Saturday, April 20, 2013. The powerful earthquake shook China's Sichuan province on Saturday morning, nearly five years after a devastating quake jolted the province. (AP Photo)

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