DC: Sunshine and Warmth Return for Memorial Day Weekend

By Jordan Root, Meteorologist
May 25, 2014; 3:46 AM ET
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A surge of warmth is coming just in time for Memorial Day weekend around Washington, D.C.

In the wake of spotty thunderstorms to end the week, the period from Sunday through Memorial Day is forecast to be free of rain with a warming trend.

Folks who have outdoor barbecues or picnics to attend on Sunday will have a great day for them. Highs will bump into the low 80s with plenty of sunshine.

The warming trend will carry over into Memorial Day with temperatures peaking into the upper 80s.

Those who plan on attending Memorial Day actives at Arlington National Cemetery or watching the National Memorial Day Parade will have beautiful weather for it.

However, sunscreen and sunglasses will be a necessity for anybody that is outdoors for an extended duration.

The only ongoing thunder around the area through Monday will be for the Rolling Thunder Motorcycle Rally in honor of POWs and MIAs.

RELATED:
Detailed Washington, D.C., Forecast
Interactive Radar for Washington, D.C.
Forecast Temperature Maps

A nice evening will be in store for the Nationals 7:05 p.m. Memorial Day baseball game.

Showers and thunderstorms will return on Tuesday as warmth holds on and humidity increases.

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