DC: Even Warmer Air to Pour in for Memorial Day

By , Senior Meteorologist
May 26, 2014; 2:45 AM ET
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While temperatures cracked the 80-degree mark on Sunday, even warmer air will reach Washington, D.C., on Memorial Day.

Temperatures will once again soar on Memorial Day, exceeding Sunday's high and and reaching a high in the upper 80s.

Some people may notice an increase in humidity, but the holiday will not feel oppressive.

The other good news for those attending Memorial Day actives at Arlington National Cemetery or watching the National Memorial Day Parade is that thunderstorms will stay away from the city and its suburbs.

However, sunscreen and sunglasses will be a necessity for anybody that is outdoors for an extended duration. This includes baseball fans who are planning to go to Nationals Park Monday afternoon to watch the Nationals take on the Miami Marlins.

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The only ongoing thunder around the area through Monday will be for the Rolling Thunder Motorcycle Rally in honor of POWs and MIAs.

Showers and drenching thunderstorms will return on Tuesday as the warmth hangs on and humidity increases.

Memorial Day forecast from AccuWeather.com MinuteCast™ has the minute-by-minute forecast for your exact location. Type your city name, select MinuteCast™, and input your street address. On mobile, you can also use your GPS location.

An end to the early taste of summer will come by Wednesday as the passage of a cold front brings a reduction in the heat.

AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Jordan Root contributed to the content of this story.

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