Dangerous Flash Flooding, Storms Threaten I-95 Wednesday Evening

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
May 1, 2014; 4:34 AM ET
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Dangerous flash flooding will threaten the I-95 corridor Wednesday night, especially from New York City to Washington, D.C.

Heavy rain will continue to inundate the eastern mid-Atlantic into Wednesday night, pushing streams out of their banks and covering streets in perhaps feet of water.

"The main threat in the Northeast will be from life-threatening flash flooding," said Northeast Weather Expert Dave Dombek.

Some areas will receive more than 4 inches of rain, some in a quick amount of time.

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Enough rain and poor visibility can occur to disrupt flights at major airports from Washington, D.C., to Philadelphia, New York City and Boston into Wednesday night.

"A few of the storms will also bring the potential for strong wind gusts and large hail, while a handful of the smallest storms could produce a brief tornado," Dombek said.

However, the highest risk for severe weather will be across the Southeast.

Travel along stretches of I-40, I-70, I-80, I-81 and I-95 could be hazardous at times due to gusty storms and areas of blinding, heavy rain.

A nearly stationary storm system over the Upper Midwest will continue to push warm, moist air across the Southeastern states and will begin to push warm, moist air across the mid-Atlantic.

The threat of heavy, violent thunderstorms into Wednesday evening will span from northern Florida to southeastern Georgia, coastal South Carolina, eastern North Carolina, central and eastern Virginia and central and lower Maryland.

Severe weather will becoming increasingly isolated into Wednesday night though.

Part of the northern Florida Panhandle was overwhelmed with heavy rainfall Tuesday night. Portions of the Pensacola, Fla., area received over a foot of rain which caused flooding.

For some storm-weary people in the South, this will be the second or third day in a row with the potential for damaging thunderstorms.

"According to Southern Weather Expert Dan Kottlowski, "The strongest storms that erupt in portions of Virginia, the Carolinas and southeastern Georgia will bring damaging winds, large hail and isolated tornadoes."

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The number of storms will be decidedly less numerous and less intense over much of Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi. Much of this area may have no storms at all.

During Thursday into Saturday, the large storm stalled over the Midwest is forecast to weaken gradually and lift northward into Canada.

However, this slow process may allow another round of thunderstorms to fire right along the Atlantic Seaboard on Thursday from New England to Florida. Should a disturbance rotate in during the afternoon and evening hours, the thunderstorms could become locally severe.

Chilly showers over the Midwest are forecast to become less extensive moving forward into the weekend as the old storm diminishes. There is just the chance of a brief shower for Derby Day at Churchill Downs.

Content contributed by AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Andy Mussoline

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