Damaging Storm Risk for Dallas Saturday Evening

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
October 12, 2012; 6:06 AM
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A strengthening storm system will produce a major severe weather outbreak over the Plains Friday and Saturday.

The greatest risk of damaging thunderstorms in the Metroplex and north-central Texas will occur late in the day Saturday and Saturday evening.

The developing storm system marks an end to the tranquil weather being experienced over much of the nation in recent weeks.

Warm and more humid air will continue to flow across Texas into Saturday.

How quickly low clouds burn off on Saturday may determine the severity of some of the storms in the region. If much of the day ends up being sunny, the heating will be maximized and may provide extra energy for the storm.

During Friday, severe thunderstorms will affect part of the northern Texas Panhandle to south-central Nebraska.

During Saturday, building warmth will lead, in part, to severe thunderstorms from southwestern Wisconsin, Iowa and northwestern Illinois to north-central Texas.

The most intense storms are likely to focus over portions of Iowa, western Missouri and eastern Kansas. The risks from the storms include damaging wind gusts, large hail, flash flooding and a few tornadoes. However, locally severe storms can reach as far south as the Metroplex with high winds, hail and blinding downpours.

During Sunday, the main line of storms is forecast to slowly settle to the south and east of Metroplex. However, there may still be some areas in central and northeastern Texas that experience locally strong thunderstorms and the potential for flash flooding.

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