Cleveland: Bitter Cold Start to March

By Kristen Rodman, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
March 03, 2014; 11:10 AM
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As another major winter storm unfolds across much of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, bitter cold will return to Cleveland to kickoff the start of March.

After 2 to 4 inches of snow fell on the city Saturday night, temperatures will drop back into the teens to finish out the weekend.

The first few days of March will be very cold. Until midweek, temperatures each day are forecast to range from the high teens to the low 20s.

The coldest nights of the week will be Sunday and Monday, as temperatures near 0 F. Anyone outdoors during the evening hours should use caution and wear proper layers, as cold-related illnesses like hypothermia and frostbite are possible.

RELATED:
Detailed Cleveland Weather
AccuWeather Winter Center
Northeast Regional Radar

The city's next chance for snow will come on Tuesday. By midweek, temperatures will begin to shift and a slight warmup will begin.

By Friday and into the weekend temperatures will rise into the mid-30s.

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