Six Dead After Vehicles Crash in New Mexico Dust Storm

By Mark Leberfinger, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
May 23, 2014; 9:22 AM ET
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(Photo/tntphototravis/iStock/Thinkstock)

Six people died in a multi-vehicle crash Thursday afternoon on Interstate 10 near the New Mexico-Arizona border.

The crash occurred about 5:30 p.m. MDT when passenger and commercial vehicles collided in a dust storm near Lordsburg, New Mexico in Hidalgo County, The Associated Press reported.

Winds were gusty in the area around the time of the crash, AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Matt Rinde said.

The Lordsburg Regional Airport recorded gusts up to 30 mph about an hour before, Rinde said. There was also thunder around the airport.

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New Mexico State Police didn't say how many vehicles were involved in the crash.

Interstate 10 was closed in both directions after the crash, but police reopened the westbound lanes Thursday evening.

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