Boston: Which Storms This Week Could Bring Snow?

By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
January 14, 2014; 3:53 AM ET
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The first storm of this week will brought rain to the Boston area Tuesday. However, storms on Thursday and Saturday have a chance of bringing some snow to the area.

Temperatures will be well above freezing through the day Wednesday, so no real problems from snow and ice are in store through then.

A storm moving in from the Midwest will weaken reaching the area Wednesday into Wednesday night.

Just enough cold air will move by Thursday to support snow or a mix of snow and rain.

The problem is a storm may be too far offshore to tap lingering moisture and bring snow in the first place, let alone bring heavy snow.

RELATED:
Detailed Boston Forecast
Boston Interactive Weather Radar
Will It Snow on February 2 at East Rutherford, N.J.?

If it were to snow with the storm Thursday in New England, chances are it would not be a major snowfall and the snow would be spotty in nature.

AccuWeather.com meteorologists will continue to monitor the potential for snow Thursday, as well as a storm on Saturday.

The weather will be significantly colder this coming weekend, but not nearly as cold as the arctic outbreak of earlier in January.

Tune in to AccuWeather Live Mornings every weekday at 7 a.m. EST. We will be talking about the storms this week, any chance of snow and the return of colder air.

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