Boston: First Accumulating Snow Possible Early Monday

By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
December 9, 2013; 5:03 AM ET
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A storm coming early Monday morning has the potential to bring travel problems to Boston and much of New England from snow, ice and rain.

While a large amount of snow is not expected around Boston, the city could receive its first inch of snow of the season during the morning hours of Monday.

The heaviest snow along the I-95 corridor impacted the Washington, D.C., to Philadelphia area Sunday, which lead to accidents and nightmares for airline passengers.

The snow is expected to arrive before daybreak. Warmer air is then forecast to move in during the storm Monday, causing a changeover to a wintry mix, then rain from the coast to inland areas.

As usual, areas north and west of the city will have the longest duration of snow and ice, as well as more general slippery road conditions.

RELATED:
Detailed Boston Forecast
Boston Interactive Weather Radar
Winter Weather Center

There were delays out of Boston Logan International Airport Sunday night that could likely continue through Monday due to snow and wintry mix at first, then from rain and low ceilings later.

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