Tony Losing Tropical Characteristics Over Open Atlantic

By , Senior Meteorologist
October 25, 2012; 7:10 PM ET
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It has been a busy week thus far in the tropics.

Monday was quite a busy day in the Atlantic Basin with the formation of both Tropical Storm Sandy and Tropical Depression 19. By Tuesday, T.D. 19 had been upgraded to Tropical Storm Tony as it moved northeastward well east of Bermuda.

Tropical Storm Tony is located about 900 miles west-southwest of the Azores and unlike Sandy, a scenario for the final destination of Tony does not involve the United States.

Tony will instead track to the northeast over the open waters of the Atlantic through midweek, remaining a weak tropical storm.

The lifespan of Tony may be over before Sandy even emerges from the Caribbean and reaches the Bahamas. A non-tropical storm over the north-central Atlantic Ocean should absorb Tony by late week.

Tony's remains could still bring enhanced rainfall to the Azores this weekend.


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