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    Hudson Valley to Get Strong Wind from Sandy

    By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
    October 29, 2012; 3:15 AM ET
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    While Sandy will slam ashore in New Jersey, the large storm will still cause problems in the Hudson Valley.

    The worst of the storm will slam the mid-Atlantic and southern New England into Tuesday. However, the storm will behave more like a large nor'easter in terms of size and a hurricane in terms of strength. Folks should not just focus on the center of the storm track as a result.

    According to AccuWeather.com's CEO Barry Myers, "Sandy is a hurricane wrapped in a winter storm."

    Sandy will bring strong wind gusts ranging between 50 and 60 mph over much of the middle Hudson Valley. Higher gusts will occur over the hilltops and the lower Hudson.

    Such winds can down some trees and cause power outages. Avoid parking under or walking through wooded areas during the storm.

    Rainfall can be heavy enough to cause urban flooding.

    A repeat of Irene from last year does not appear likely over the upper Hudson Valley into Vermont. By the time the storm moves into New York state, via Pennsylvania at midweek, it will have lost the majority of its destructive power in terms of rainfall. However, gusty winds can still cause problems.

    However, for the lower Hudson Valley to New York City, the storm is likely to be much worse than Irene in terms of storm surge flooding and high winds.

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