Monday Snowstorm Continues for Virginia, Delmarva

By , Senior Meteorologist
March 3, 2014; 12:25 PM ET
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A far-reaching storm with substantial snow and ice was finishing its wintry task over the mid-Atlantic on Monday.

This will remain a complex winter storm with plunging temperatures setting the stage for treacherous ice and substantial snow and record lows. In some cases, the ice and snow are following a period of rain and even violent thunderstorms.

Fresh arctic air pouring into the Northeast will spare places from I-80 northward in the Northeast from the snowstorm. At most, an inch or so will graze the New York City area. Southern New England should escape with very little, if any, snow.

AccuWeather.com meteorologists have determined that the heaviest snow will instead focus farther south over the mid-Atlantic from the mountains of West Virginia to northern and central Virginia, Delaware, Maryland and southern New Jersey through Monday.

Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Dover, Del., and Atlantic City, N.J., are bracing for substantial snowfall that will total 6 inches. Some places will even have amounts reach a foot.

Snowfall rates at the height of the storm may reach 2 inches per hour, causing the snow to quickly clog major interstates.

RELATED:
Latest Update on the Major Winter Storm
Latest AccuWeather.com Snowfall Forecast Map
Northeast Regional Weather Radar

Commuters will face extremely treacherous travel, along with lengthy flight delays and cancellations on Monday. Residents will be dealing with more disruptions to daily routines and school cancellations.

The snowstorm comes after temperatures surged into the 40s and 50s across much of the mid-Atlantic on Sunday. Any wet roads or sidewalks will rapidly freeze as colder air arrives and the rain transitions to a period of ice, then the heavy snow.

Evident by the icy conditions that unfolded around Dallas on Sunday morning, arctic air is having no trouble pressing farther south than previously anticipated, and AccuWeather.com is concerned for rain changing to a glaze of ice as far south as Charlotte, N.C., later on Monday.

Bridges and overpasses would be the first to turn icy, and snowflakes could even bring the ice to an end in Raleigh, N.C.

This storm system has been responsible for dropping heavy amounts of sleet from Texas into the Tennessee Valley. An incredible 6 inches of sleet was reported in Huntingdon, Tenn., with 4- to 6-inch amounts of sleet common across northwestern Tennessee.

Freezing rain left thousands of customers without power in Arkansas as of early Monday morning, and also left a glaze of ice around Nashville. The combination of sleet and freezing rain made roads very slippery in much of Kentucky, with crashes closing a portion of Interstate 75 south of Lexington on Sunday evening.

Please visit the local forecast page for more precise details on how the winter storm will impact your area.

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