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    100-Degree Warm-Up Ahead for Some States Next Week

    By By Heather Buchman, Meteorologist
    February 12, 2011, 7:38:07 AM EST

    A major, prolonged warm-up is finally on the way for the eastern two-thirds of the nation next week.

    After a record-shattering, frigid morning with lows well below zero in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri and Kansas Thursday, temperatures could jump nearly 100 degrees in some areas by late next week.

    A change in the overall weather pattern will allow milder air to spread through this region, as well as the rest of the Plains, Midwest and parts of the East, over the next few days. A more substantial warm-up will follow next week.

    In the areas of Oklahoma, Kansas and Arkansas where temperatures dropped between 20° and 30° below zero F Thursday morning, highs in the 60s are in the forecast for late next week.


    300x200_02101720_210warmup


    In some areas, temperatures could even make a run for 70°. This would be close to a 100-degree warm-up from Thursday morning's frigid lows.

    The warmer air will also help to melt the record-setting snowstorm that dropped up to 1 to 2 feet of snow in those areas Tuesday into Wednesday of this week.

    Milder air will also overspread the rest of the Plains, Midwest and parts of the East over the next few days with the most substantial warming coming toward the middle and end of next week.

    AccuWeather.com Chief Long Range Forecaster Joe Bastardi has been highlighting the potential for an 80-degree day in Dallas, Texas and a 70-degree day in Washington, D.C., in the next week or two.

    Keep in mind though, one of the last places to warm up in this pattern will be the Northeast.


    300x200_02101719_210northeastwarmup

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