• Saharan Dust: How Does it Impact Atlantic Storms?

    The Saharan Air Layer, or known more commonly as Saharan Dust, is a layer of tiny aerosols like sand, dirt, and dust that occasionally push from east to west across the tropical Atlantic Ocean during hurricane season.

  • Derecho: 'The Land Hurricane'

    Derechos are referred to as land hurricanes due to the hurricanelike conditions that occur over land with this weather phenomenon.

  • How Do Tropical Storms and Hurricanes Form?

    Similarly to the natural process of pregnancy in humans, an animal, or other living creatures, storm systems have a distinct set of factors and processes to go through before a tropical storm or hurricane can be born.

  • When Sea Breezes Crash

    If you live close to the coast, then you are used to sea breezes all year round. The temperature difference between the land and ocean creates the breeze along the coast.

  • Spring Brings Devastating Squall Lines

    Squall lines occur when intense thunderstorms organize into a solid line. Along the leading edge of the storms, winds can be quite destructive, sometimes topping 60, 70 and even 80 mph.

  • Why Is the Radar Sometimes Wrong?

    A weather radar follows some of the same principles at a flashlight. While a flashlight uses rays of light to detect objects in the dark, radars detect objects in the atmosphere using pulses of energy.

Daily U.S. Extremes

past 24 hours

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WeatherWhys®

This Day In Weather History

Chicago, IL (1920)
Killer tornado - worst in city's history. 28 died, $3 million damage.

New Jersey (1921)
Sudden temperature drop; fell 55 degrees in 18 hours and 20 degrees in 20 minutes across parts of the state. Tornado reported at Somerville.

Mid-Atlantic (1942)
11.5" of snow in Washington, DC, and 22.0" of snow in Baltimore, MD.