How We Calculate Real Feel Temperatures

AccuWeather's exclusive RealFeel Temperature® combines more than a dozen factors to provide an accurate measure of how representative the current or forecast weather conditions really "feel" to an appropriately dressed person.

In contrast, other indices such as "Feels Like" simply report either the Wind-Chill Index or the Heat Index, depending upon the temperature. Thus they only consider two weather factors: temperature and either wind speed or humidity.

The forecast may call for a high of 36 degrees, but contributing factors, such as wind chill, can make it feel like it's only 28.

To see the superiority of The RealFeel Temperature, consider two examples:

1. In the summertime, Feels Like and indices other than AccuWeather's exclusive RealFeel Temperature use only temperature and humidity, thereby ignoring sunshine, wind speed, precipitation, and the other factors that affect how we feel. We all know from our experience how inaccurate that can be. We recognize that it feels much hotter with no wind and a searing summer midday sun than it does with a 20 mile per hour gusty breeze and thick clouds. Only AccuWeather's exclusive RealFeel Temperature reflects this difference.

2. In the wintertime, Feels Like and indices other than AccuWeather's exclusive RealFeel Temperature use only temperature and wind speed - nothing else is included in their calculation. We all know from our experience how inaccurate that can be. We recognize that it feels much colder with heavy snow and gusty winds than it does standing under a bright winter noontime sun with no wind at all. Only AccuWeather's exclusive RealFeel Temperature reflects this difference.

And, as The RealFeel Temperature is protected by two patents which ensure that no other index can include temperature and more than one other factor, it is the only index which can provide an accurate measure of how the weather really feels.

More Weather Glossary

  • Hoar Frost

    After a cold, clear winter night without much wind, the ground and nearby tree branches may be covered by tiny, white ice crystals.

Daily U.S. Extremes

past 24 hours

  Extreme Location
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WeatherWhys®

This Day In Weather History

Raleigh, NC (1965)
46 degrees -- coldest ever in August.

Vermont (1982)
Three inches of snow fell in parts of the state; record lows were set in 31 northeastern U.S. cities and towns.

West Virginia (1989)
Lightning sets numerous house and trailer fires. Firefighters could not keep up with all the fires that were burning.

Rough Weather