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Rain Flees, Sunshine Returns to Los Angeles

By Mark Leberfinger, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
August 8, 2014; 8:32 AM ET

After intense flash flooding in the Los Angeles area caused travel disruptions, damage and was the cause of one fatality, the return normal sunshine and dry weather will outlast throughout the weekend.

While previous rains proved deadly, the state continues to be plagued by exceptional drought with dry conditions the norm. There is currently no rain in the projected forecast.

However, the weather will settle and residents should see calmer skies for the next several days.

Low morning clouds, however, may cause flight delays at Los Angeles International Airport.

It will be sunny each day with highs in the low 80s and nighttime lows in the low 60s.

RELATED:
Detailed Los Angeles Forecast
AccuWeather Severe Weather Center
Interactive Los Angeles Radar

Weekend activities, including the Natsumatsuri Summer Festival on Saturday at the Japanese American National Museum, won't be hampered by the weather as the sunshine continues to bathe the region.

For fans heading to Angel Stadium for the Angels' games against the rival Dodgers or Red Sox over the weekend, skies should be partly sunny making for ideal baseball weather.

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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