Henry Margusity

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PM UPDATE...Snow Maps Ready for Both Storms

December 31, 2013; 8:43 AM ET

Tuesday Afternoon Update...

Below is the GFS snowfall for the storm. Notice that amounts at the 10:1 ratio are not all that much, but keep in mind, this will be cold storm, so ratios across New England into Ohio and West Virginia will be 15:1 to 30:1 depending on the location.

The storm itself will be a windy snowstorm, especially as it strengthens heading out to sea. Without the blocking in place, we really are not going to get the Big Storm, but a quick hitting storm with snow for about 6-10 hours in any one location. With the wind blowing and the powdery snow, there will be some drifting and blowing of the snow, especially in open areas.

Following the storm, we have a day or so of cold weather before the next storm comes along and the polar vortex dumps into the Great Lakes next week. That's some serious cold weather coming next week for Great Lakes, Midwest and Northeast.


Sorry, no video today since I'm working at home, but I will have another update this afternoon.

Here's my snow maps for the storm. Interesting to see that the models overnight have backed off the snow amounts as the storm is now a flatter wave but colder in the snow area. Snow ratios will play a bigger part in this storm. NAO is just barely negative with the storm so that's why we are seeing snow into the big cities this time.

Another storm will follow late Sunday into Monday, but that one may cut west of the I-95 corridor to bring rain with heavy snows from the southern Mississippi Valley into the eastern Great Lakes. See the map below for that storm.

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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Henry Margusity
AccuWeather.com severe weather expert, Henry Margusity, offers the Meteorological Madness blog including detailed analysis of severe weather across the US.