Henry Margusity

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Heavy Snow from Mississippi to Virginia... Cold to Follow

January 17, 2013; 9:34 AM ET

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1. Updated the snow map, but no major changes to the map. Just brought the heavier snow into Alabama and Mississippi where we have already seen up to 3 inches of snow. Convection should develop this morning, and that will only increase this afternoon, enhancing snow rates across eastern Tennessee, southeastern Kentucky, western North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. The 850 mb zero degree C line is slowly pressing south into the precip, and it will take to about after lunch before we see the heavy snow developing from north to south across Kentucky and Virginia. In the meantime, the heavy snow with the upper level low will continue to move north across northern Alabama into the western Carolinas. Don't be surprised to see thunder snow across the western Carolinas and maybe even northern Georgia this afternoon and evening. Heavy snow will continue into Virginia reaching the Maryland beaches tonight where 3-6 inches will fall.

2. Behind this storm, the first shot of very cold air will come in this weekend, and that's the start of the cold weather pattern that will continue right through February. Folks in the East that enjoyed a nice winter last year are going to wish it was like last year with the mild weather.

3. Tuesday, NAO will go slightly negative, so one has to worry about the storm forming along the coast and skirting coast areas from New Jersey to Massachusetts with some snow. It's too early to tell just how much and if it will occur, but it's on the my radar to watch.

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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Henry Margusity
AccuWeather.com severe weather expert, Henry Margusity, offers the Meteorological Madness blog including detailed analysis of severe weather across the US.