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    Animated look at the 2013 Arctic Melt Season

    9/23/2013, 11:13:26 AM

    NASA has released an animated (daily) view of the 2013 Arctic melt season, which unofficially ended on September 13th.

    The animation below shows daily ice coverage (total area of at least 15% coverage) in white.

    Video courtesy of YouTube.

    You can also view the animation in higher resolution right here.

    This year's minimum sea ice extent was the 6th lowest in the satellite record, which goes back to 1979.

    Annual Arctic sea ice extent for the last 7 years. Courtesy of the University of Bremen.

    590x472_09231900_extent_n_running_mean_amsr2_previous


    The actual minimum extent was 5.10 million sq/km. Last year's record minimum was 3.41 million sq/km, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC report).

    The top five lowest extents in order were 2012, 2007, 2011, 2008 and 2010.

    The average date (1981-2010) of the annual Arctic sea ice extent is September 15th.

    Also, the Antarctic sea ice extent reached a record high on September 18th, which ties last year's record maximum.

    Annual Antarctic sea ice extent for the last 7 years. Images courtesy of the University of Bremen.

    590x472_09231902_extent_s_running_mean_amsr2_previous


    A look at the Antarctic sea ice coverage on September 18th, the unofficial date of the record high maximum.

    590x675_09231907_asi-amsr2-s6250-20130918-v5_visual

    The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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    Global climate change