Ken Clark

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Stormy Pattern Through Next Week

March 27, 2014; 2:11 PM ET

The entire month of March has been stormy for the Northwest bringing as much as two to three times the normal rainfall. This has led to the disastrous landslide in northwestern Washington, one of the worst natural disasters in Washington state history.

With time, this stormy pattern has been shifting farther and farther and starting this week has brought about a big change in the weather over much of California. Looking ahead for at least the next week, this pattern is likely to continue, bad news for the Northwest, good news for thirsty California.

A series of storms continues their onslaught about every other day through the end of next week. The farther north one is the less break one will see between the storms. In the Northwest and far northern California, there is not a day that will be totally rain and snow free. Breaks in rain will be more noticeable in central and southern California.

Because of the lower-than-normal jet stream, snow levels will be on the low side for this time of year, well below pass level even in the Sierra of California. Total precipitation amounts will be heaviest from the North Bay of California through western Washington and lightest in the Los Angeles and San Diego. In fact, in the south, totals will be well under 0.75 of an inch.

Below is what the GFS is giving for total precipitation through Thursday, April 3. The European is not too different though it is wetter in California for the storm early next week than the GFS is.

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The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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Ken Clark
Ken Clark's Western U.S. weather blog tackles daily weather events with commentary from one of the most experienced and trusted Western U.S. weather experts.