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Lunar Eclipse Tonight

April 14, 2014; 8:20 AM ET

The first total eclipse of the moon since December 2011 will be visible in North America, just in time to greet last-minute tax filers in the United States.

However, many Americans may not be in a good place to see the eclipse because of cloudy and rainy conditions.

The total lunar eclipse, resulting from the Earth's position between the moon and sun, will occur early Tuesday morning, EDT.

The eclipse will begin at 12:53 a.m. EDT Tuesday. It will reach totality at 3:06 a.m. EDT and end at 4:24 a.m. EDT.

Viewing conditions will be poor in the eastern United States, except for South Florida.

High pressure systems over the Canadian Prairies, Texas and Oklahoma will be in control bringing clear skies and good viewing conditions to the central U.S. and parts of the Southwest.

In addition to the eclipse, Mars will be on a close approach to the Earth, about 57 million miles away.

Eclipse times in Universal Time

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 5:58 Universal Time (UT)

Total eclipse begins: 7:07 UT

Greatest eclipse: 7:46 UT

Total eclipse ends: 8:25 UT

Partial umbral eclipse ends: 9:33 UT

How do I translate Universal Time to my time?

Eclipse times for North American time zones.

Eastern Daylight Time (April 15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 1:58 a.m. EDT on April 15

Total eclipse begins: 3:07 a.m. EDT

Greatest eclipse: 3:46 a.m. EDT

Total eclipse ends: 4:25 a.m. EDT

Partial eclipse ends: 5:33 a.m. EDT

Central Daylight Time (April 15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 12:58 a.m. CDT on April 15

Total eclipse begins: 2:07 a.m. CDT

Greatest eclipse: 2:46 a.m. CDT

Total eclipse ends: 3:25 a.m. CDT

Partial eclipse ends: 4:33 a.m. CDT

Mountain Daylight Time (April 14-15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 11:58 p.m. MDT on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 1:07 a.m. MDT on April 15

Greatest eclipse: 1:46 a.m. EDT

Total eclipse ends: 2:25 a.m. EDT

Partial eclipse ends: 3:33 a.m. EDT

Pacific Daylight Time (April 14-15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 10:58 p.m. PDT on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 12:07 a.m. PDT on April 15

Greatest eclipse: 12:46 a.m. PDT

Total eclipse ends: 1:25 a.m. PDT

Partial eclipse ends: 2:33 a.m. PDT

Alaskan Daylight Time (April 14-15, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 9:58 p.m. ADT on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 11:07 p.m. ADT on April 14

Greatest eclipse: 11:46 p.m. ADT on April 14

Total eclipse ends: 12:25 a.m. ADT on April 15

Partial eclipse ends: 1:33 a.m. ADT on April 15

Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time (April 14, 2014)

Partial umbral eclipse begins: 7:58 p.m. HAST on April 14

Total eclipse begins: 9:07 p.m. HAST on April 14

Greatest eclipse: 9:46 p.m. HAST on April 14

Total eclipse ends: 10:25 p.m. HAST on April 14

Partial eclipse ends: 11:33 p.m. HAST on April 14

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About This Blog

Astronomy Blog
The AccuWeather.com astronomy blog, by Mark Paquette, discusses stargazing and astronomy issues and how the weather will interact with current astronomy events.