Brett Anderson

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Snowstorm Update

February 17, 2013; 3:17 PM ET

Brief update on the Maritimes storm.....

Very intense storm (970 mb or lower) with eye-like feature is now steadily approaching the south coast of Nova Scotia.

Based on pressure falls, model data and surface observations, it looks like the center of the storm will pass over or just east of Halifax, N.S., early this evening then eastern PEI tonight.

Rain is currently changing back to sleet and snow now across southwestern N.S. and this process will continue northeastward into this evening.

The heaviest axis of snow (30-45 cm) will be across eastern New Brunswick through eastern Gaspe. Moncton should stay all snow with a general 30-40 cm by early Monday morning. In this region, there will be blizzard conditions tonight with snow drifts of 1-1.5 meters.

There will be accumulating snow wrapping back into western, central and northern N.S., including PEI, this evening into tonight as the cold air wraps in on powerful north to northwest winds. Expect 2-8 cm in and around Halifax, with higher amounts to the north and west and 8-12 cm for Charlottetown, PEI.

The worst of the winds will be tonight with power outages possible. Also, where it rained things could ice up pretty good tonight.

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You can also follow me in regards to this storm on twitter @BrettAWX

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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About This Blog

Brett Anderson
Brett Anderson covers both short-term and long-term weather and storm forecasts for Canada in this blog for AccuWeather.com.