Elliot Abrams

Share |

Misty, Mild Mornings

October 3, 2012; 7:38 AM ET

Wednesday 10 a.m.

Temperatures a mile overhead in the Northeast today would support afternoon ground-level temperatures well up in the 80s today... if this were July. In July, the sun climbs high in the sky. Mornings warm quickly; soon it is very warm or hot. Not so fast in October, though. The longer nights allow more time for the temperature to drop to the saturation point, and soon fog forms.

The fog prevents much solar energy from the reaching the ground to cause warming. If there are higher clouds around like there are at many places today. the warming process is delayed further... and before we know it the sun is sinking back toward the horizon. The changing amounts of clouds and fog can wreak havoc on temperature forecasts. Despite this, we can say confidently that temperatures in Middle and North Atlantic states will run higher than the long-term averages for this time of year.

Fog may redevelop late tonight and longer tomorrow morning. On Friday, however, slightly drier air will advance from the west and southwest... and with the breeze picking up, it could turn out to be the warmest day of the week. A cold front will arrive and be followed by noticeably cooler air for the weekend. The cold front is associated with a low pressure area that will cause heavy snow across parts of the far North Central states and adjacent Canada. This video shows the expected progression of events:

Dense fog has often proven to be very challenging for painters and photographers. You can see why with this image from a webcam overlooking the area between the Statue of Liberty and the buildings of Manhattan.

http://vortex.accuweather.com/adc2004/pub/includes/columns/abrams/2012/120x90_10031240_screen-shot-2012-10-03-at-8.17.04-am.png

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

Comments

Comments left here should adhere to the AccuWeather.com Community Guidelines. Profanity, personal attacks, and spam will not be tolerated.

More Northeast U.S. Weather Blog

  • Two-Part Storm to Affect the Northeast

    March 3, 2015; 10:06 AM ET

    The thin blue line is temperature. Notice how it is left of the black line near the bottom, meaning the ground level temperature is below freezing. Several thousand feet overhead, however, it is warmer than 32 degrees, so any snow falling through that layer melts.

  • Snow to Rain at Chicago Tomorrow; Later in NYC

    March 2, 2015; 9:08 AM ET

    Today is the National Education Association's Read Aloud Day. If you have young children or grandchildren, I hope you get the chance to read to them today, and on many other days. On today's video, I tried reading to you.

  • Northeast: Two Storms in the Next Four Days

    March 1, 2015; 8:14 AM ET

    The storm moving from the Ohio Valley to the Middle Atlantic coast will cause snow and ice, Clearing should follow tomorrow, but another storm should bring snow and ice followed by rain from Maryland to Massachusetts.

  • Northeast: Two Storms in the Next Four Days

    March 1, 2015; 8:14 AM ET

    Clearing should follow tomorrow, but another storm will cause snow and ice followed by rain from Maryland to Massachusetts late Tuesday into early Wednesday.

  • Northeast: March to Come in Like a Penguin

    February 27, 2015; 7:38 AM ET

    The wind will not roar like a lion in the Northeast on Sunday March 1. It certainly won't be lamblike. However, with more cold and snow in the forecast, it might be suitable for this group:

  • Partially Snowy; Totally Cold

    February 26, 2015; 8:09 AM ET

    The surface analysis shows to low pressure area off the North Carolina coast, a large cold high pressure area in the northwest corner of the map, and a broad northeasterly flow of cold air between pressure centers. Cold will continue in this whole area through Saturday.

About This Blog

Elliot Abrams
Elliot Abrams from AccuWeather.com offers this Northeast Weather Blog for the U.S. with regular updates on NE weather from a leading forecaster and meteorologist.