Elliot Abrams

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Storms Reach the Great Lakes for the Weekend

October 11, 2012; 8:16 AM ET

Thursday 9:30 a.m.

The dreariness of yesterday morning in the Northeast has been replaced by dazzling sunshine and deep blue skies. A fast-moving cold front will send clouds streaming across the Great Lakes then New York and New England today and tonight, then a large high pressure area from western Canada will move for the start of the weekend. You can see and hear what this high pressure area should do in this video, along with what the flow behind it should accomplish later in the weekend.

In the short burst of cold air into the eastern Great Lakes tomorrow, showers will break out in the same areas that had them last night and this morning. Since this air mass is a little colder, snow showers are likely over the higher terrain southeast of Lake Ontario. Snow showers with lightning and thunder hit the Tug Hill Plateau last night, and the same thing can happen late tonight or tomorrow morning.

Severe thunderstorms are likely to break out in the middle of the country late tomorrow and tomorrow night, then rain and thunderstorms will advance into the Great Lakes for Saturday. A switch to a southwesterly flow aloft should keep the moisture mostly north of the Middle Atlantic states for much of Sunday... but as a cold front swings around a few showers should reach the area from southern New York to Virginia on Monday.

In most of the Northeast, it is a dazzling day, with the bright sun playing off the leaves that change hue by the day. It's quite a contrast from the dull dreariness much of the region experienced the first half of the week.

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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About This Blog

Elliot Abrams
Elliot Abrams from AccuWeather.com offers this Northeast Weather Blog for the U.S. with regular updates on NE weather from a leading forecaster and meteorologist.