Elliot Abrams

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Mainly Moist from DC to NYC

October 10, 2013; 6:39 AM

Thursday 9 a.m.

Today's video shows how the weather will change (or stay the same) between today and early next week.

On this map, we see the circulation around the storm that is east of the Carolinas. The diagonal blue line marks the approximate location of the Appalachians. In zone 1, the flow is coming downhill from the mountains and becomes drier and warmer. In zone 2, the moist flow from the ocean is forced to rise, making it cooler and more moist (the actual amount of moisture in the air does not change much, but as air cools it approaches the saturation point.

The final northern boundary of the rain remains uncertain and it makes a big difference. Where the rain reaches, it can be damp for a few days. Just to north that location, it will be dry through the weekend! It appears now as if the boundary will run close to I90.

The arrival of the persistently rainy weather pattern in the Middle Atlantic states brought to mind some of the dreary reports I have provided in such situations in the past when we are witnesses to wetness.

Simplified and Succinct Local Forecast: A misty moat of moisture looms large as we move through the day. Yes, another castle of cloudiness, a mansion of moisture, the ramparts of rain, with the development of drizzle have annexed the Atlantic area, cruised the coast and made the mountains misty and the slopes slippery. This makes us weary of dreary and dismayed at the dismal, not to mention grumpy about the gloom. Of course one may ask, is there a measure of maybe, a dimension of doubt or a slice of speculation? Or is our only way through into the weekend to traverse the corridors of clouds, the pathways of precipitousness or the miasmal membranes of mist? Indeed we should be cognizant of clouds and witness to wetness later today and tonight as we go through the garden of gloom, drift through the dungeon of dismal and stay planted beneath the glistening and glittering of random raindrops that plaster the palace of precipitation. Sometimes the clouds will seem long on threat and deficient in delivery, but there's no denying we're in the domain of the dim and damp under a lint-filter sky.

A slate gray overcast presides over this dull and dreary, dim, dark day. It won't just be the dim, dark and dull, drippy dreariness that makes it seem so drab, dull, dismal and dank, but rather the combination of drab dullness and dreary, dim, dark drippiness that makes the dismal darkness so dreary and dull, drab and dim, and the drizzly dampness so dismal and dark, not to mention dim, drab and dull. Yes, a boring processional of steel wool clouds scrapes across the sky. Everywhere you look, the dishrag sky is draped in sullen saturation smothering our scene, a dreary and damp, dark, dim and dull setting remarkable for its dullness and distinguished by the dim and damp. Now you may ask, how long will it remain dim, dark and damp, dull, dreary and drippy? How long before the drippy dishrag discharges its dreary cargo and leaves to dim and dampen someone else's day? How many more stupid questions will we have before we get some answers around here. The answer, in truth, is that our dreary, dull and dark, damp domain will be dominated by dimness and drizzle today tonight, tomorrow and tomorrow... then this weekend the dampness will diminish then depart. Until it does however, it'll be mostly misty and moist; dull, damp and dreary. So, in case you're curious, in the meantime, the sky will be cloud-clogged continuously and sullenly steadily saturated within the Northeast's castle of cloudiness surrounded by its misty, moist moat.

The misty moat of moisture looms large as we move through the rest of the week, prospect of sunshine tenuous. Yes, a castle of cloudiness, a mansion of moisture, the ramparts of rain, with the development of drizzle have all annexed the Atlantic and cruised the coast. This could make us weary of dreary and dismayed at the dismal, not to mention grumpy about the gloom. Of course, one may ask, is there a measure of maybe, a dimension of doubt or a slice of speculation? Or is our only way this week through the corridors of clouds, the pathways of precipitousness or the miasmal membranes of mist? Indeed we should be cognizant of clouds and witness to wetness as trickles later today and tonight alternate with temporary torrents of fluid flow. However, mainly we go through the garden of gloom, drift through the dungeon of dismal and stay planted beneath the glistening glittering of random raindrops that plaster the palace of precipitation. One day, some day things will change.

One other thing. The GFS model suggest there could be snow showers downwind from the eastern Great Lakes in two weeks. The forecast varies from one model run to the next, so... wait and see!

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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About This Blog

Elliot Abrams
Elliot Abrams from AccuWeather.com offers this Northeast Weather Blog for the U.S. with regular updates on NE weather from a leading forecaster and meteorologist.