, °F

Personalized Forecasts

Featured Forecast

My Favorite Forecasts

    My Recent Locations

    PHOTO: Dazzling Meteor Streaks Over Maine Lighthouse

    By By Nina Sen, Space.com Contributor
    April 02, 2014, 6:30:30 AM EDT

    A blazing meteor disintegrates across a glittering night sky with planet Venus and the Milky Way galaxy beaming brightly over a lighthouse in Maine in this stunning image recently sent to Space.com.

    Astrophotographer Mike Taylor took this great shot, which is one frame from a 2.5-hour time-lapse captured on March 4 at the Marshall Point Lighthouse in Port Clyde, Maine.

    "A meteor burns up in the atmosphere with a nice green tail next to the tower, making a triangle in the sky, which includes Venus and the core of the Milky Way," Taylor told Space.com in an email. [More amazing March night sky photos by amateurs]


    575x384_04021428_meteor-venus-milky-way-taylor

    Taylor used a Nikon D600 camera and 14-24mm @ 14mm, f/3.2 – 30 seconds – ISO 3200 – WB Kelvin 3570; to capture the image. The image was processed through Lightroom 5 and Photoshop CS5.

    The Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy comprising roughly 400 billion stars and stretching between 100,000 and 120,000 light-years in diameter. A massive black hole — billions of times the size of the sun — lies at the center of the galaxy. A light-year is the distance light travels in one year, or about 6 trillion miles (10 trillion kilometers).

    To see more amazing night sky photos submitted by Space.com readers, visit our astrophotography archive.

    Editor's note: If you have an amazing night sky photo or video that you'd like to share for a possible story or image gallery, please send images and comments to contact managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

    Follow Space.com on Twitter @Spacedotcom. We're also on Facebook & Google+. Original article on Space.com.

    Copyright 2014 SPACE.com, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    Report a Typo

    Continue Reading on Space.com >

    Astronomy