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Northern Japan Next Target for Danas

By Erik Pindrock, Meteorologist
October 9, 2013; 3:53 AM ET

Former Typhoon Danas rocked parts of Ryukyu Islands on Monday and is now drenching parts of Japan and southern South Korea with heavy rainfall.

Danas has weakened and is now a tropical storm as it passes between Japan and South Korea with bands of heavy rainfall across the region. These areas can get upwards of 150 mm (6 inches) of rainfall before the storm departs to the northeast.

Another threat will be thunderstorms with damaging winds and the potential for tornadoes across southern Japan through Tuesday night as bands of heavy rain move through the area.

The next target for Danas will be northern Japan as the tropical system speeds off to the northeast.

The current Japan radar can be seen here.

Danas acquired tropical characteristics Thursday night local time just north of Guam then strengthened into a typhoon Saturday night.

After dealing with around 125 mm (5 inches) of rain and tropical storm-force winds in Okinawa, Japan, from Typhoon Fitow Friday and Saturday, Danas slammed the Ryukyu Islands on Monday with damaging winds and blinding downpours. Wind gusts to 195 kph (120 mph) were felt across Yoron Island, as the eye of Danas passed directly overhead.

Danas will continue to weaken as it is pulled to the northeast by a frontal boundary. Although some damaging winds will still be possible as Danas crosses northern Japan during the next 24 hours, the main threat will be flooding rainfall and mudslides as rainfall of 50 to 100 mm (2 to 4 inches) is expected.

Residents that remain in the path of Danas should be finalizing preparations in anticipation of power outages and structural damage from this tropical system.

Bottled water, batteries and non perishable foods are some examples of necessities that should be stored in a safe place when making final preparations.

Image of Typhoon Danas Monday night, local time, courtesy of NOAA.

Danas will continue to weaken into Wednesday as it is pulled northeastward by a frontal boundary. This frontal boundary will cause Danas to transition into an extra-tropical system over the Sea of Japan before making a landfall in northern Japan on Wednesday.

Danas will still produce locally damaging winds along with the threat of flooding rainfall and mudslides as it moves across northern Honshu and southern Hokkaido Wednesday into Wednesday night.

While Tokyo will dodge the worst of Danas, wind gusts on Wednesday could still top out between 50-65 kph (30-40 mph).

Whatever is left of Danas will then race east-northeastward away from Japan on Thursday, allowing the country to dry out and recover from any adverse impacts.

Another cold front will then bring the threat for a soaking rainfall to much of Japan from later Friday into Saturday.

Updated by Meteorologist Eric Leister.

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