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    Hurricane Agnes Photo Gallery

    By Samantha Kramer, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
    June 22, 2012; 8:12 AM ET
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    This week in June marks the 40th anniversary of Hurricane Agnes, one of the most devastating and costliest storms in United States history. To read more about the great floods that spread through the Northeast in 1972, read Expert Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski's report.

    You can also view a video and read the stories of victims who were affected by the storm and how they have recovered since 1972.

    The town of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and other parts of the Wyoming Valley were hit especially hard when the Susquehanna River crested at a record-breaking 40.9 feet. (Photo courtesy of "Great Floods of Pennsylvania" by William H. Shank)

    When the Forty Fort dike broke, the nearby cemetery was uprooted. Caskets were torn from their resting grounds and tombstones were completely destroyed. (Photo courtesy of "Great Floods of Pennsylvania" by William H. Shank)

    Most efforts to stop the water flow were to no avail. Here, Wilkes-Barre citizens attempt to block off roadways near the Luzerne County Courthouse from the Susquehanna River. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    A boat travels on top of the Coxton Road Bridge in Duryea, Pa., instead of under it on Saturday, June 24, 1972. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    The Susquehanna River swells to meet the rising Lackawanna River, forming a gigantic moving puddle among West Pittston, Exeter and Duryea. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    A Swoyersville, Pa., woman is rescued by boat. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    Even two-story-high houses were not spared by Hurricane Agnes. Here, brand new homes in south Wilkes-Barre are completely inundated. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    Residents in small boats pass by The Grand Hotel on East Market Street in Wilkes-Barre. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    Many Pennsylvanians were told to "prepare for shock" when returning to their homes. Here, a man attempts to repair the roof of his house that was partially destroyed by Agnes. (Photo courtesy of The Times Leader's "After Agnes: A Triumph Over Destruction")

    A chair hangs off a power line and a staircase leans against the utility pole on Northampton Street in Kingston. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    Slabs of concrete are all that remain of Riverside Drive and Old River Road in Wilkes-Barrre after the flooding destroyed the street's infrastructure. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    The flood created sink holes and buried homes like this one on Charles Street in Wilkes-Barre. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    A worn-out Wyoming Valley resident rests on the railing of what's left of the staircase to her house. More than $1 billion was offered in state and federal aid for cleanup in the Wyoming Valley, but many citizens were forced to start over if they didn't have flood insurance. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

    Tired, frightened looks like this Wyoming Valley woman's were common during that last week of June as Hurricane Agnes swept through the Northeast and turned many Pennsylvania towns upside down. (Photo courtesy of "The Great Flood of 1972" by Paul Warnagiris)

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